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Game of each single point

It was great to see Drew on my recent trip to the West Coast.  He is a networker who is excited about the Point A project and has mad skills.  He also has stories.

One of his stories that i was excited about was his experience of playing Frisbee at Acorn.  An ultimate game he claimed was the best he had ever played.  Not because we are especially good players, tho we can field a respectable team.  It was the way we play.  In his blog he writes:

We didn’t keep score, something I hardly noticed at the time. It wasn’t necessary to keep score because we were all infinite players playing a series of finite games.

It was at the moment of the opening disc thrown that the finite game started. We played for the point at hand. Not for the accumulation of points. Once that point was scored the finite game ended, the winning team got the title of team to most recently score a point then we started play on the next finite game.

Yes we play Frisbee in the snow

Yes we play Frisbee in the snow

We played to keep the game going. If one team kept winning and the other team was getting frustrated we would trade players to even out the skill levels. We would adjust the rules, boundaries on or off, people rotating out, etc. to ensure that the game continued (until sun down, of course).

Each finite game was played to it’s fullest. We played with great seriousness. Even more serious than professionals I would guess. Because no point was worth any more/less than another. We were never so far behind in points that scoring couldn’t keep us from losing or so far ahead that we could go easy on our opponent. We were never playing warm up or pre-season games that “didn’t matter”. We were playing for the point, the only point—at that moment in time—that mattered.

I had not thought of this analysis before, but i found it compelling.  While not universal, anarchist score keeping (aka not keeping score) is common in the communes.  Quite some Volleyball games start and end with scores of 7 to 7.  They are no less fun that ones i played with highly competitive rules and cultures.

Ultimate-evolution

Climb like a Spider, Climb like a Monkey

We climb trees.  We often muse as to the number of other people in the county or state who are also climbing trees when we are (typically midnight under a full moon).  There is a new place to climb to at Twin Oaks.  Shal and Christian built it.

You can't get there from here

You can’t get there from here

​About​ 50 feet up a tree on Pagan Ridge​ there is a platform
​ complete with railings​ which is the perfect resting place as you are climbing towards the stars.  But don’t bother showing up to this new attraction​ yet​, unless you know how to climb both like a spider and like a monkey.

spider and web

This is not an easy climb​ (though Shal already has plans for how to make it much easier)​.  The tree has no branches for perhaps the first dozen feet which is plenty discouraging to most people.  Shal is not most people.  Launching climbing ropes into higher branches he set up the tree so for folks with the right equipment it is possible to climb.  You need​ climbing rope an​d harnesses and two types of​ ascenders, and quite some level of conviction

accender

We arriving in the fading light, the tree is prepped, with a climbing rope up it​, but not in a way which would be at all inviting to a random passerby.  Shal helps me into the harness and sets up​​ ropes and ascenders and bags.  We will likely be the only tree climbers this evening to bring a powerful portable sound system.  We like to listen to Tangerine Dream​ space music​ while we watch the moon rise and talk about our lives and plans.

Shal and Platform

Shal and Platform

Shal reminds me of the slightly counter intuitive spider climbing technique.  You alternate between ascenders, standing in a loop connected to one, then sitting back being supported by the other​​ which is attached to your climbing harness​.  We have done this before, but he needs to teach me again, for it feels strangely backwards.  I ascend the first dozen feet, climbing ropes vaguely like a spider.  At the first real branch I​ ​leave the foot loop behind and start climbing like the monkey i am more closely related to.  The lower ascender remains attached to my harness and the rope​, so if i made a mistake the ascender would stop me in a couple of feet.

a tiny part of the panoramic view

a tiny part of the panoramic view

Even as the light fades the view from the platform is amazing, we can see far across most of the Twin Oaks land and soon appreciate the additional light from the moon rise.  We celebrate the new a​real place to reside on our monthly full moon outings, and we plan trips to the West Coast Communities Conference at Groundswell Community, and other adventures out we​st.​

​S​hal is also spent some time figuring out how to create a rope pulley ascending system that will make it much easier for several people to get to this lofty perch.  Only one person will need to climb it like we did last night, and then will be able to set up the pulley at the top so several people will be able to safely pull each other up one at a time.  S​o even non-climbers will be able to enjoy the airy view.  ​

Seeing the moon-lit world from high in a tree while listening to spacey music and planing new adventures might not be what anyone else was doing last night, and it might just be that everyone else got it wrong.

 

Which words can we still use? Commune? Communism?

There are all manner of messages which we want to get out to the world and recently myself and my comrades working on the Point A project have been thinking about what messages people are ready for.

Anarchist_Communist_Flag_by_TapiocaDeath

These messages, perhaps?

On our most recent NYC trip we realized that we were making it sound harder than it really is to become income sharing.  “They don’t need to have a cottage industry.” GPaul said, “They don’t even need to live together.”

Indeed, the only thing which stops people from becoming income sharing is a lack of trust.  If you trust each other, you can change your agreements and begin taking care of more needs cooperatively almost immediately.

We started thinking about a workshop that would explain this. But what do we label the workshop?

I wanted to call the workshop “You can become income sharing now!” But GPaul and others thought it was not compelling enough or it was too abstract.  GPaul even questioned whether people would know what income sharing is. GPaul’s rework was “Communism Now! Why wait for the revolution?”  Alarm bells went off in my brain.

Can we reclaim this damaged name?

Can we reclaim this damaged name?

I wrote GPaul:
Communism is dead.  Sorry, it is a political non-starter, worse than anarchism actually (tho not as bad as Stalinism and Fascism).  Many progressives and almost all liberals do not associate it with a quasi-utopian desirable state.
Nothing jumps to mind to salvage the title, since I get your meaning and there is not an obvious substitute (Utopia Now!, Equality Now! Community Now! all don’t work).
In his provocative way GPaul replied:

I both agree and disagree: Communism is dead to some people, perhaps even most people, but communism is not dead.  The question here is “who is our audience?”.    We have many possible audiences.  One audience could be radical leftists.  When giving tours and explaining the communes to folks I’ve been leading with “anarchism” and “communism” for years and getting surprisingly little shock or pushback.  Radical leftists are one demographic that is more likely than others to be interested in what we are offering.  We can aim a workshop at them.  They will respond differently to the word “communism” than other people.  For other people we might have to rebrand this workshop.  For other people this might not even be an appropriate workshop (we might have to begin with “why should you want to share income?” in any of its various permutations).

I remain skeptical, but I am curious what my readers think. you say commie like it is a bad thing Some readers will be glad to hear that this blog is finally getting reorganized.  Specifically, the portion of the blog which is about community life (including the Point A work, the Virginia egalitarian communities, Freedonia and other underground efforts, Commune Snapshots [images with few words], the Communities Conference and advances in sharing techniques) may be spun off and turned into its own blog with its own domain name.

I was thinking of the name CommuneLife.org – but other experienced communards thought the name “commune” was too dated, too distant and too misunderstood and untrusted.  When we talked to twenty somethings, they had no baggage around the word commune and thought it might be cool.  The Fellowship of Intentional Communities actually uses the word commune as a name for income sharing communities and lists 166 of them under this category.

Again, feel encouraged to weigh in and discuss your thoughts about this.

Commune Snapshot – Acorn edition

Yes, we have a pet cow, called Pandora

Yes, Acorn has a pet cow, called Pandora. Though she is most frequently referred to simply as “Cow.”  These friends include Dragon, Falcon, Mac and Rejoice.

This chalk board elephant is being used to develop a new language at Acorn

This chalk board elephant is being used to develop a new language at Acorn

Falcon and Irena picking orders at Southern Exposure

An alternating text and picture game we play

Exquisite Corpse: An alternating text and picture game we play

Canoe in a truck

Stephanie and Elan off to places which don’t require seat belts

Community Supported Dumpster Diving

Supermarkets are hugely problematic.  They distort purchasing behaviors, contribute to obesity, cut wages to farmers and more.  There have been several responses to this situation, including farmers markets.  The direct workaround for supermarkets is Community Support Agriculture or CSA for short.  CSAs have customers buying shares directly from farmers and typically every week they get part of the harvest in a box they go pick up.  When harvests are good, customers share in the bounty, when harvests are low customers agree not to complain, and as a result, they feel like they are in the game together with the farms.

CSAs give better prices to farmers by cutting out the powerful broker of the supermarket.  They provide money faster to farmers, earlier in the season when they often most need it.  They share the risk between farm and end consumer in a way that supermarkets have no interest in sharing.  They typically offer better profits for farmers and lower prices for end customers.

Our fine friends in Freedonia have taken this idea to the next level.  [If you don’t remember Freedonia is our pseudonym for actual urban communities which are doing clever but illegal things in undisclosed locations.]  They are starting Community Supported Dumpster Diving (CSDD) or what one communard calls Community Supported Gleaning.

Active dumpster diving collective households pull in dramatically more food from dumpsters than they themselves can use.  Other collective households agree to sort, clean, prep, store and divide the bounty as it comes in (often at absurd o’clock in the morning).  Finally a set of other collective houses come and pick up the recovered food and feed it to their people.

There are gems in those dumpsters

There are gems in those dumpsters

If you have not been dumpster diving in an urban area, you might miss the cleverness of this plan.  Normally, dumpster divers are presented with a dilemma.  There are 60 bunches of perfectly good banana’s here, but if i bring them all back 1) we will never eat them in time and most of them will rot.  2) We will spend a bunch of time cleaning and storing them and will end up losing out on other dumpster bounty.

CSDD solves this problem in several ways.  Crews get sent out knowing their own collective household need not clean and consume everything they rescue.   By having the different people doing food prep from the people who are doing the dumpster diving, you avoid asking exhausted dumpster divers at 3 AM to then spend hours cleaning and in some cases food processing all the bananas.  By spreading the dumpstered treasure over several different collective households, you share pro tips, strategies and critical information about urban dumpsters among a growing crowd of experts and don’t burn people out by having to do so much dumpstering in an given week.  By having separate crews doing cleaning and food processing, you rescue a greater fraction of the salvaged food.

Get the right gear - Cartoon Credit WikiHow

Get the right gear – Cartoon Credit WikiHow

There are complex discussions going on between Freedonia and other collective households.  Who can join the CSDD?  Is it possible to just buy shares (like in CSAs) and not do any of the work?  How do we evaluate the different types of efforts, space needs, storage costs, administrative work etc?

But the Freedonians i spoke with said the project (still in early stages) is going fabulously so far, people are not sweating the details and are upping the collective dumpster diving game dramatically – dropping food prices for people living in cooperatives, reducing the amount of wasted food in the system and providing adventurous activities for people who might otherwise simply be sleeping.

Who builds a better future?  Those who are willing to try.

Who builds a better future? Those who are willing to try.

i am excited about where this idea can go, and that it proves that by cooperating we can create a lifestyle which is both more resilient and more fair.

Presents for Propagandists

I am not into birthdays, including my own.  Turns out if i simply turn off the Facebook birthday notification of mine, I can avoid the dozens of robotic “Happy Birthday” messages which I get from otherwise creative people who like me.   I had a lovely birthday including a trip to the free STI clinic, an unrelated rushing around adventure and lovely conversations about forming new communities in Colorado.  It felt like a good day to be alive.

As an anti-materialist, I am an unusually difficult person to get presents for.  Most people don’t even try.  With the exception of my generous mother, it was almost a gift free celebration.  Lovely.

mindless_consumerism

But as the day ended, in the last look at email messages I got the most lovely present from Audrey from the far reaches of Quebec.  Audrey is one of those shooting stars we get through the communes, who enchant us endlessly but we can’t hold onto because they have other adventures that beckon them.

Audrey enchants as an Amazon Warrior in the ZK living room

Audrey enchants as an Amazon Warrior in the ZK living room

Without even knowing it was my birthday, she game me the most lovely of presents – a translation.

One of my favorite self-generated pieces of propaganda is a morsel of writing from way back called “Why I am an anarchist.”  There is a strange history to this piece, which includes that it exploded the collective that was supposed to turn a set of these essays into a book.  But that is another story.

Audrey appreciated this proclamation and mentioned when she last left Twin Oaks/Acorn that she planned on translating it.  And I did not think much of it.  People offer these kinds of things with some regularity, but translation is non-trivial work and can easily get lost behind the rest of the things you are doing.

The original unbirthday party

The original unbirthday party

I am pleasantly surprised and gratified for my multi-lingual friends who help spread these radical ideas around.  What a lovely unextraordinary day to be alive.

Whither Batman, Emerge Triple Threat Tony

She had me from “Batman”.

Triple Threat Tony has had other names, depicted above in Santa Fe

Meet Acorn’s newest intern, shown above in Santa Fe

It is intriguing to observe the cultural differences between the communes and New York City.  On the last Point A trip, Acorn’s newest intern (who back then was called Batman) introduced herself a few dozen times over the trip.  No one blinked.

It was as though they had had dozens of people call themselves Batman before.  Knowing there must be some revealing or at least interesting story, none of them thought it would be appropriate to ask for it.  While on the communes, this introduction reliably drives the next part of the conversation.

But the origin of Batman was problematic, it hailed from a romantic partner who was no longer in the picture.  So I suggested a naming party, and she embraced the possibility.  She wanted a dual purpose new name.  One which could embrace the exotic strangeness and quirky freedom which the communes could offer, while also having a more mundane nickname version which she could answer the business phones with.  Nickelodeon could become Nick, for example.  Prof Pocket could become Po.  She, having a traditionally feminine given name, also wanted something which sounded masculine.

We are nto going this way

We are not going this way

But Batman was a cool name and some communards were reluctant to give it up.  Strandbeest in particular wanted to contribute by keeping the old name with a new origin story.  When Batman challenged “What will I say when people ask about my name?” Strandbeest (who is now called Jayne – along with a half dozen other things – after the Firefly character, who is apparently both stupid and mean) countered “Because I am the hero Gotham deserves”.  Which in the early moments of last night’s naming party was pretty compelling and almost derailed the entire event.

There were a few other attempts at new origin stories to rescue the old cool name from the ash bin of history, but it was not to be.  Our vivacious new intern had fully embraced the idea that a new name was an opportunity and was compelled by the daring prospect of having a group of friends rename her from the very long list of possibilities.

-2

She had lots of options

She did of course whittle down this list.  She was not going to be called Styrofoam, or Lasersnake or Ronald Raygun.  Though to her credit she was willing to consider Styrofoam if there was a clever Babylon acceptable nickname which was spawned.   But despite our best efforts none was revealed.

-4

The group decided that a tie would make me more official

Acorn does not do naming parties like Twin Oaks does.  We don’t name our cars or our buildings generally.  Names appear comically or organically or mysteriously without explanation.  The event was well attended, perhaps because of it’s novelty but more likely because she is an unusually well-liked new addition to our colorful hyper-family.

Surveying all she can see

Surveying all she can see

Besides the attempted new origin story, we also tried some new things at the naming party.  It is not uncommon for us to reduce the list of names thru a number of binding polls.  The first is usually that you have 5 up votes and 3 down votes.  As an experiment after we had done a couple of elimination rounds, we did a non-binding round with three negative votes and single positive one – just to see what people were grumpy about. The least favorites were the more bland options, such as Dylan and Neil.

-3

The revised list

In the end, we choose “Triple Threat Tony”, in part because this was a name that she herself quite liked.  It satisfied the male identification aspect with Tony.  It has the option of endless entertaining sub-names (I am calling her Triple Threat, others have compressed to just “Trip” or “Tone”).  She will still answer to Batman, which some Acorners are unwilling to part with (perhaps this will lead to her name drifting into free fall).

And despite the name change, for me she will always be hero that Gotham needs.

Tony2

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