“Well, that’s rude.”

Don is having surgery at the same time he is changing rooms.  This creates another complication in the elaborate chess game of commune room assigning.  Typically, members recover from surgery in Nashoba which is designed for convalescence.  So Jim (who lives in the infirmary in Nashoba) is getting bumped out of his room while Don is recovering.  Jim knew this was possible when he moved in and has chosen to stay in the building, even though several “unbumpable” rooms have opened up since he moved in, presumably because Nashoba is quite a nice building to live in and we have perhaps one recovery process a year, so he does not get bumped often,  this may be his first time.

Jim was excited about the prospect of moving into the old room of the member who was having surgery.  He got ready to move down there and then found that a neighbor in that building had decided to move into the room which was being vacated.  Upon hearing this Christina commented “Well, that’s rude.” knowing that Jim had been excited about moving (tho only for the period of recovery) to this room.  Bochie and Aubby quickly countered “No it is not”

Room assigning and room rights are somewhat complex here.  In this case, Jim’s status is that of a guest in the building (despite him being a full member of the community).  The person who wants to move into the room permanently is a member of the building (we call them SLGs for Small Living Group).  The rights of the SLG member supersede the rights of guests in the building, even if they were excited about it.  We choose to have these various control structures and agreement, principally to avoid the lengthy squabbles which we believe would ensue otherwise.

It gets more complex still.  Wren is interested in moving into Ta Chai, the building where most of this shuffling is happening.  If she decides she wants to do a 3 week guesting period in the building, she could bump Jim as well (in this case possibly  completely out of the building).  But they are both guests, right? Why does she have priority?  There are guests and there are guests.  Wren as a guest interested in living permanently in the building has priority over Jim who is just being placed there until his room is free again and could, theoretically at least, be placed in any free room.  Wren is interested in actually living in Ta Chai so her room rights are more important in this case.  In this case Wren will likely wait until the recovery period is over, so Jim can keep his Ta Chai room for a while, because Wren is nice.

So it is not rude actually, it is how we do things culturally around here.

About paxus

a funologist, memeticist and revolutionary. Can be found in the vanity bin of Wikipedia and in locations of imminent calamity. buckle up, there is going to be some rough sledding.

10 responses to ““Well, that’s rude.””

  1. Bliss says :

    Wren does sound nice! I love hearing the different intricacies of working through life in one community vs another. At EW there is only one SLG, so outside of that if there had been an arranged room trade between two members there would have been no discussion about it outside of them and no thought to take the space, but if a room opened up and more than one full member wanted it (there is priority ascribed to different levels of membership), then we’d roll dice for it. Slightly different process :)…

    • paxus says :

      Only 1 SLG, but a bunch of residence ? Dont they use seniority for moving rooms inside residences? And what about returning members wanting to return to the residence, do they have priority over others?

  2. Scott Busby says :

    Sounds like the room assigner would have an easier job in this “Sliding tile puzzle” if there were more rooms overall. ( Note my recurring “build a new building” theme. )

  3. Bliss says :

    Nope, no priority for either of those things, but lots of options to go on leave, and as long as you’re on leave your room is held for you, even if it’s for a year. During that time your room can be lived in after a certain amount of time while you are gone, but it remains yours and you get it back when you’re back on the farm and on the system, so anyone staying there knows it’s not really theirs in the long term. There is no priority for returning members who are returning without membership (if they’d retained their membership, they’d have been on a leave), or for long time members wanting the same room as a new member. There might be some social initiative for a new member to defer to an old one, that would depend on the way the wind is blowing in the present moment, but there is no built in stipulation for it. When a room is open, it’s put on an open room list, and is available if someone just goes to the room assigner and asks for it. If the room has just come up for availability, a note goes up on the dayboard, people wanting the room sign up for it, and if it’s more than one person, they throw dice. So I recommend practicing your dice throwing if you want a personal shelter… 🙂

  4. Bliss says :

    Also except for the SLG, there is no inside the residence collective to speak of, so people don’t get permission to move into a building, they just move there unless someone has a specific concern they feel strongly enough to voice. I love the different ways the same issues work themselves out! I wonder if this is different in part because TO seems to make a lot more use of their communal living room spaces in each residence than EW does?

  5. Dan Kappus, Huitzilopotchli says :

    OOOOOOhhhhh, I like the idea of using chance to decide things. Even with a fancy-dancy process, I figure you’re just about as likely to win some and lose some, and by that point, you’ve used up all this time and patience. The law of large number is a way to ensure true equality!

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