Hair Styles as a public good

The normal method for determining hair styles is slightly inverted.  We think about what we think makes us look good and we ask the people cutting our hair to create hat look.  Usually, this is done through the eye of the person who is wearing the hair style, what it is they think looks good or appropriate for them.  However, unless this person is obsessed with there appearance, it is quite likely that other people will be looking at their hair much more than they will be.  So shouldn’t these observers be deciding how it should be cut?

Part of Sara’s asymmetric doo – nice curl

It took something over 48 hours for me to look at my most recent hair cut.  Rob Jones grabbed my hand and put me in front of a mirror.  i get that this is a bit odd.  As a regular practice i dont spend very much time in front of a mirror, i dont look at myself when i brush my teeth (which people also find odd).  And because this haircut was especially dramatic, i was curious how long it would take for me to find myself in front of a mirror inspecting it.

People ask me why i decided to cut my hair so short.  It was not actually me who decided.  I have a fairly long history of other people having unusual influence over my hair, often frustrated intimates saying “i am going to cut your hair” and doing it.

And the more i think about it, the more i think this is the way it should be.

 

 

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About paxus

a funologist, memeticist and revolutionary. Can be found in the vanity bin of Wikipedia and in locations of imminent calamity. buckle up, there is going to be some rough sledding.

4 responses to “Hair Styles as a public good”

  1. angietupelo says :

    I usually hate seeing you with short hair, but I actually really like this cut. Sara’s hair also looks fabulous.

  2. Jason Sharma says :

    I was a hairdresser at one time… so this is of particular relevance to me.

    When I got into it, I thought that it would be a nice, relaxing creative outlet for me, and let me tell you, boy I was wrong! Most of my customers were working age men (and they are generally the only ones with the money and need to have their hair cut frequently), and they came to me not because I was the most creative, or the most interesting to talk to. They came to me because I was fast, which meant that I could work for cheap. And 95% of the people got the same haircut: Tapered in the back, Off the ears and neck, and about a bit more than finger’s width on top, and clean shaven. A little shorter for physical laborers, and a little more freedom for low class, with light beard growth permissible for older workers. How can a people call themselves a free society when even the most minute detail of their lives is controlled to such a tight standard? The mass of people are probably more tightly controlled now in America than probably any population of people at any time in human history, all in the name of marketability. Sure, hair is a trivial matter. I mean, it grows back quickly enough, but for me, it is a matter of pride. Think about it. Ties, high heels, business suits, do things things serve any practical purpose other than to symbolize an individual’s submissive obedience to corporate authority? A unique appearance is a sign of a free individual, and I have too much pride to take up the look of a slave.

  3. Jermaine Trembinski says :

    I have seen a new hair straightener that has plates that detach it looks very different at motherhair.com

  4. Emanuel Ideue says :

    Teens know what’s going on most of the time when it comes to the fashion industry and the hairstyle choices that are most ‘in’ according to experts. Teens are usually on the cutting edge because they aren’t afraid to try new and exciting styles and they are normally the first to examine the looks of Hollywood icons. Teen hair style can be wide and varied in the look and color; ^

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    <.http://www.beautyfashiondigest.com/hair-extensions-for-short-hair/

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