Pressing the PANYC Button

Names have power.  I spent years going to a summer environmental youth festival in Europe called “Ecotopia”.  Regular participants consider themselves Ecotopians. We talked about “Ecotopian Principals”.  When things went well, we marveled at the “Ecotopia spirit”.  It was originally the title of a book by Ernest Callenbach, who coined it in his 1975 popular classic, which was a prophetic tale of the Northwest region of the US succeeding and reversing industrial capitalism.  But the name  quickly went on to mean much more to many people.   If we had, for example, called it Summer Green Fest, we would have identified with it less deeply and it might well have died a decade sooner. Ecotopia landscape Some of the best names are ones which occur organically.  I remember when we were designing an all womens anti-nuclear office in Prague which was staffed by internationals.  Emily said “Why don’t we just call it the Prague International Anti-Nuclear Office?”  I said “don’t you think that is a little long?” She said “We would call it PIANO for short, the acronym.”  Instantly there was no other choice, we just started calling it Piano from that day on. The Point A project wrestled a bit initially with what to call ourselves, we wanted a good name.  But the more we talked about it, we realized that the communities that the project created would have their own names, identities and origin stories – so a good name would be nice, and i like Point A, personally.  But it is not a brilliant name. Busy people compress things.  Your goodbyes are shorter, repetitive tasks get shaved by seconds where you can and multi-word names you have to type repeatedly become acronyms.  Point A has a growing number of specific urban sub-projects (including currently DC, NYC, Baltimore and Richmond).  So i started writing Point A – NYC and then PA – NYC and finally PANYC.  omg what a great name. Dont-Panic We are often told “don’t panic”, not just in the context of the hitchhikers guide to the galaxy, but to maintain order.  From where i sit, if we follow this strategy the chances for the planet to survive are vanishingly small.  The people who want us to stay calm are often the same ones who think Climate Disruption is not a thing.  They think business as usual is the way to go and they most certainly think that we should respect the powers that be and the current authority structure.

Cartoon-Climate-Disruption

Totally a thing.

I could not disagree more. We need to be panicking.  We need to be doing things dramatically differently.  Business as usual is suicide, convenient and lucrative for a tiny fraction of the population, certainly.  But no less suicide for the planet and everyone we care about. Well see if the other folks in the project are as excited as i am by this name and the implications.  But i have a spring in my step just thinking about it.

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About paxus

a funologist, memeticist and revolutionary. Can be found in the vanity bin of Wikipedia and in locations of imminent calamity. buckle up, there is going to be some rough sledding.

4 responses to “Pressing the PANYC Button”

  1. Kelpie says :

    Yes, names are important! Myth and fairy tales tell us this over and over. And NYC desperately needs more radical eco-groups!

  2. MILO says :

    Rather than Ford Prefect’s advice, try The Doctor’s: Run! then reverse the polarity.

    • moonraven222 says :

      Ah, yes. Reversing the polarity–probably the most important thing we need to do right now. But it’s hard to do when you’re running. (Note: the Doctor never gave these two pieces of advice together.)

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