Don’t Buy Land First

I am one of the moderators on an interesting Facebook group called the “Intentional Community Discussion Group“.  A very typical posting is “I just bought X beautiful acres, and I want to start an intentional community.  What should I do next?”

My answer is “Find a time machine and unbuy the land.”

Time-Machine

Generic Time Machine – Available on EBay

This feels deeply counter intuitive to many.  If you want to start a community and you have the capacity to buy land for your potential group, won’t it help the process along if you start by acquiring the land and then offer it to the group?

Sometimes it does, mostly it does not.    The deal with starting a community, lots of people think they want to do it, but they don’t have all the friends and allies they want to do it with, so the accessible starting place looks like buying land.  But as soon as you buy the land it stops being “We are starting community” and it becomes for everyone else “Should we join this existing project?”

building sustainable cities.png

Starting community is a fragile time.  Some huge fraction (perhaps over 90%) of new communities fail.  Most forming communities never get passed the “We are talking about it” stage.  People want different things from community.  And many people have huge hopes that community will solve a myriad of problems for them.  “I will find my tribe.”  “I won’t have to cook every meal myself.” “I will be able to live off the grid.”  “I’ll have less stress.” “I’ll live with people who care for me.” “I will reduce my carbon footprint.”  And dozens more.  Starting community is an anti-gravity project.

The process of harmonizing the different needs and desires of prospective communards is the most important conversation you will have in your forming community.  If one of the desires of a member you love is ” I want to reduce my time commuting”, then you have almost certainly chosen the wrong place if you have already purchased land.  If their need/desire is “I want swim everyday” then your lack of stream or pond in your land purchase might be a deal breaker.  If someone needs for their cat to roam free outside and you have chosen a beautiful piece of land near a coyote refuge, then you have already scuttled their participation.

when-she-finds-out-you-are-not-a-pokemon-master

beware the deal breakers

The key point here is when you are starting up a community the most important thing is to build the group.  And one of the most important decision for the group is which piece of land/buildings should you start with.  If you make this decision for the group, the forming community loses one of it’s most important identity forming choices.

 

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About paxus

a funologist, memeticist and revolutionary. Can be found in the vanity bin of Wikipedia and in locations of imminent calamity. buckle up, there is going to be some rough sledding.

One response to “Don’t Buy Land First”

  1. Patience Lowe says :

    astute. the farm in tennesee was interesting acquisition. they all landed there and the farmer said ok. husband and brother inlaw bought land together not involving either wife. only one still lives their and neither marriage is still intact. buying together is the first step of the investment in community or renting or long term lease

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