Archive | Willow/Family RSS for this section

Commune Exports – Fatherhood

In the time of Trump, it is critical to seek high functioning alternatives to the mainstream culture.  Twin Oaks and the surrounding cluster of egalitarian communities could be a model for new behaviors of sharing technologies and cooperative culture.  But perhaps our most daring export, because many default culture citizens think they are expert in this, is how to be a father.

commune-dads

Keegan and adder (sic) are two young fathers living in a rural income sharing egalitarian commune.  But if you are willing to listen, i think their advice might be applicable for your world as well.

Other articles about communes and families:

This is a rich topic.  Your comments are welcome.

willow-star-and-paxus-in-pussy-hat

Willow behind me, before Women’s March (Pussy hat by Hawina)

Uninauguration- DC Jan 21st.

This is a repost of the CommuneLife blog.  Lot of great pictures of communards getting out and being part of what many are describing as the largest protest in the history of the country.   There is still lots to do, and we can celebrate that this event was a big gathering and an inspiring success.

Photos by Steve and GPaul of Compersia Folks from the DC and Virginia communes were very involved with the protests: Christian and Paxus of Twin Oaks appreciate PETA’s big fuzzy suits. Vegans GPaul of Compersia and Christian of Twin Oaks pose with PETA people. Paxus of Twin Oaks and GPaul of Compersia rest after the […]

Multi-colored “pussy hat” on Paxus was knit by Hawina, who was unable to attend, but wanted to be there in spirit.

 

via Uninauguration — commune life

Appreciations and Fist Bumps

I am constantly on the lookout for new transparency tools.  I have been ending the most recent transparency groups i facilitate with a simple popcorn of appreciations. Whoever felt moved would acknowledge someone else in the group for something they did or a way they are in the world that was appreciated.  This was fine, and occasionally compelling, elegant and simple.  And as a tool, it was a bit weak.

Kelly from the Point A DC group shared someone else’s appreciation tool at the recent retreat which i immediately snapped up because it is much more powerful.  In go round style, people said what it was that they wanted to be appreciated for.  This is a bit like a pointed “if you really knew me” where we get to learn a very specific and important thing about you: what it is that you feel under-recognized for that is none-the-less important to you.

It is a bit unclear where to go after this under-expressed appreciation is voiced.  Currently, i have someone in the group who feels like they can validate this appreciation in their own words.  When i said i wanted to be appreciated for my sloppy and unreliable organizing style, Hawina said “Minimal effort, maximum effect.  Yeah Paxus!” and pumped her fist.  It was perfect.

hawina

Hawina – Circa 2013

But the commune affords other unprompted appreciations.  I do a weekly tofu trays shift. You get dressed up for this work – boots, apron, gloves with liners, ear protection, hair nets.  In the winter months this is cold, wet, heavy, loud, rushed, non-stop physical work for 3 plus hours (i get that compared with many jobs in the mainstream a single 3 hour weekly shift would seem like a breeze, but we are spoiled).   I do this work year round, regardless of my membership status.

tofu-paxus

I was coming into my trays shift recently and new member David was finishing up in his similar protective garb.  He explained to me that the curds were wet and needed to sit longer and drain to make the proper weights.  And then he started to walk away towards the clothes changing space.  Then he turned around and came back and said,

“Hey, i appreciate that you do this unpleasant trays work even when you don’t live here.”

fist-bump

And then he put out his glove in a fist and i bumped it.  I don’t think i have ever done a fist bump like that before.  As in “we are all part of the same team, making it happen together.”  And it really hit me.

12767478_10205778673805719_738563448_n

David and his new favorite cow

Fun Tables: Normal and Super

Living in community is often about zoning.  We ask people not to talk about work on the steam table line in our dining hall.  We ask people not to be topless in places where local people are likely to come by.  We restrict 18 wheel trucks to the industrial park portion of the community.  We have a building that the visitors live in while they are checking out the community.  Smoking is significantly restricted in location.  There are only certain places in the community where you can smoke cigarettes.

And at meals we have “fun tables“.  There are two large tables, one inside and the other outside, which are designated as “fun tables”.  Oh, fun happens in all kinds of places, but they have this name because we have agreements about what happens at them.  Specifically:

  • You can always sit a fun table
  • If there is no room, we will make room
  • No meetings or private conversations
  • No talking about work
wavy fun table

Pass the salt, please.

Willow is often the fun police.  If you start talking about work, he will call you out, sometimes by honking at you.  Some people try to get away with talking about work at the fun table by talking about it in funny accents.  Willow is rarely fooled by this ploy.

Times change, cultures evolve.  We have added the Staedtl, which is a collection of couches and comfy chairs which face each other.  You don’t have to ask to sit in this area and the conversations are an uncontrolled mix of private, public and somewhere in between.  Work is fair game and the fun police are not welcome.

We also have “super fun” tables.  These have the same rules are a normal fun table, except you can talk about work if you like, no need for silly accents.

mad tea party surreal

a quiet moment at a super fun table

 

 

6 Creatures and 4 Communities

One of the most important capacities of intentional communities is changing culture.   This can be changing how people dress, how we report relationships at work, how we teach our children or how we observe holidays.

Valentines Day has always struck me as a broken holiday.  It celebrates just one style of relationship, sets people up for too big or too small gifts of their caring, and creates many people who feel left out.    Before I lived in community, even when I had a single romantic partner, I never liked this holiday much.

Many years ago, in response, our sister community East Wind developed Validation Day as an alternative.  Every member is celebrated in the form of affirmations, no romantic partner required.  Part of the celebration is the creation of cards.  There is a great dance, often a kissing booth and the 6 creatures game.

Paxus signign validation day cards

Validation Day prep 2001?

The 6 creatures game is designed to take the rejection out of asking someone to hang out or even to make out.  The idea is that leading up to the party (which happens around February 14th, famous worldwide for being my son Willow‘s birthday), people who want to play are given a ballot with the names of the others who want to play.  There are options (represented by different creatures) for a work date, a play date, a cuddle date, to kiss at the party, hot sex and/or a relationship.

For anyone who is playing, you select what you may want to do with them.  I might just want to kiss someone at the party.  If they selected only a work date and a play date for me, we would miss each other completely, getting no matches with each other when the games were returned. But if I had selected a play date and kissing at the party, then we would match on the play date and both be informed of that only.

petals on table romance

Regular readers will not be surprised to discover I play this game somewhat recklessly.  I was willing to have at least a work date or play date with perhaps 80% of the people on this years 6 creatures game ballot.  And in my experience, many of the created matches don’t actually get acted on and every year there are some surprises. Yet some of the matches turn out to be important, even life changing.

About 40 people decided to play the 6 creatures game this year, spanning four different communities in the area: Twin Oaks, Acorn, Sapling and Cambia.  This is new; until recently only Twin Oaks members played.  But as the movement expands locally, more communards want to play this long lever game.

hearts and candles

Validation Day is a more internal holiday.  Some events, like New Years Eve and Anniversary are big holidays where we invite lots of people to come.  Validation Day is still a larger event, but it is more intimate people who know us better.  You certainly should not come by without being invited.

 

 

2015 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2015 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The Louvre Museum has 8.5 million visitors per year. This blog was viewed about 95,000 times in 2015. If it were an exhibit at the Louvre Museum, it would take about 4 days for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

Un-ghosting

twins ghosting

For something in the range of 3 years, I have not had my own bedroom either at Acorn or Twin Oaks. I have been ghosting. I have a shelf in the suite that Hawina and Willow share, where I have some stuff. Some other possessions reside in the Tupelo attic. Beyond this, I live out of and a collection of travel bags and I also draw heavily from our collective clothes library. Between the communities there are always enough slack rooms and when I had the job of room assigner at Twin Oaks I had an intimate understanding of where the slack bedrooms were. I could float.

i don't drink coffee for exactly this reason

I don’t drink coffee for exactly this reason

I get that this would not work well for most people. You can either look at it like you are homeless, or as though you are on a marathon traveling adventure, where you are looking for just the right place to land, knowing it might well not be an option the next night.

I’ve stayed a lot in GPaul’s room at Acorn, because he is mostly doing Point A work in Washington DC.  He is still an Acorn member.  Fortunately for him and me, Acorn values the network building efforts he does do.  While he is away he does not count towards Acorn’s soft agreed population limit of 30 people.  So i often sleep in his room.  But the last two times i have tried to use the room, i failed.

The first time i just wanted my shoes.  I was going to Italy and i thought it would be nice to have the only reasonable piece of clothing i actually control, which are these simple leather shoes.  I don’t use them much but sometimes, for public speaking or trade shows, i take them.  They are comfortable and i think they look nice.

The leather shoes i sought looked sort of like this. My desire eluded me.

The leather shoes i sought looked sort of like this. My desire eluded me.

As is my way, i am packing at about 4 AM, before a 6 AM departure.  I have my little flashlight and i am going to into GPaul’s room to rescue these shoes.  I figure if i am really quiet, it should be fine.  It was a hot night.

I opened the door slowly and there is a naked body sleeping on top of the sheets.  I close the door.  The penalty for tardy packing is that i don’t get to take my shoes to Italy.  I was never able to figure out who was actually in that bed.  It appears that they were wildcatting (sleeping in a room that was not assigned to you).  It doesn’t really matter.

laying-in-bed-unique-consignment

The second time I tried the room, I wanted a place to sleep. This time there was again a person sleeping there, a relative of a member who was visiting. I could have gone to the Rec Collective, which has 6 bunk beds which almost always has a free bed.  But instead i opted for a couch.  Acorn has pretty great couches for sleeping.

I am becoming an Oaker again as part of my dual member switching and, unlike the last two times i rejoined, i am going to take a room this time.  The room i am technically taking over is one of the most bizarre on the Twin Oaks campus. It is called the Hobbit Hole.  It is called this for a number of reasons, but mostly it is because of the unusual door to the room.  This door is 3.5′ tall, at the high end.  The low end is about 2′ tall. Most people have to crawl into the room.

IMG_2912

First you have to climb a ladder, then you need to turn around and duck down, then you need must crawl thru the door on your hands and knees.

Update:  While the Hobbit Hole was lovely, i am following the cool kids and moving back to Ta Chai, into the same room i shared with Puck for quite some time.