Tag Archive | Point A

We are not selling a product

Written by GPaul some links by Paxus originally posted on the Point A Blog.

A few days ago several people sent me this article about co-living in New York City. Co-living came to national attention a year and a half ago when co-living groups in the San Francisco bay area, like the Embassy and Campus networks and Open Door Development, got a flurry of press attention (here, there, and elsewhere).
co-living dinner looks fun and multi cultural

co-living dinner looks fun and multi cultural

I spent some time trying to reach out to the folks mentioned in the story and am still unclear about whether the stories described a genuinely new thing (communal living updated for the networked age) or simply an old thing (group houses) with good branding and fancy websites made by people whose success in life depends on their ability to cast what they’re doing as innovative and disruptive. The label encompassed diverse assortment of houses, networks, and projects that sometimes shared little in common aside from a demographic and not all of whom were aware that they were being labeled as “co-living” spaces.
 coliving_logo_blue
It was an interesting development of ambiguous meaning that I’ve continued to keep an eye on and occasionally try to research further. At best they could harbor some innovative ideas on how to adapt collective cooperative living to the modern networked age, its technology, its economy, and its culture. At worst, it was group houses for the techie crowd and its aspiring capitalists. Harmless enough.

The recent story in the New York Times highlights a different model, though, and raises different worries.

The article describes several attempts, mostly in New York, to commodify the group living experience, in one case by a single landlord but in others by corporations. The whole thing strikes me as a quixotic recuperative attempt by capitalism.

Much has been written about the ways that capitalism and consumerism, sometimes accidentally and sometimes intentionally, leads to isolation, alienation, the destruction of community, and the impoverishment of meaning. Because of this we have been, for some time but especially recently, in the midst of a realization of the value of what has been lost and a mass attempt to recapture it. The longing for community, authenticity, and meaning has spawned, in whole or in part, the back to the land movement, the local food movement, intentional communities of all stripes, foodies generally, the tiny house movement. Sometimes this quest for meaning and connection has led to radical departures from and alternatives to capitalism. Sometimes it has led down a path of quick recuperation with capital once again creating spectacles and commodities that promise community, connection, and meaning.
co_living cartoon
The problem, of course, is that capitalism is structurally incapable of fulfilling these very human needs. Community is the result of a web of relationships and arises where people have some common context or experience choose to enter into relationship with each other as equals. Hierarchies and inequalities make free and authentic relating nearly impossible. It is a deeply and essentially democratic process and simply cannot be enforced from above or outside and thus cannot be packaged and sold. Meaning, similarly, is something that can only be generated by a person through experiences that are important to them. Objects themselves have no inherent meaning or authenticity. Those qualities are imparted by the relationships that they take part in. You can no more buy meaning than you can buy love.

The New York City Co-Living projects profiled in the article are trying to take something essentially internal and induce it from outside. They promise that through them you can buy satisfying friendships and meaningful experiences. But they can only awkwardly ape the results that cooperative communities achieve spontaneously. Their communities are doomed to be hollow simulacra with all the appearance of a cooperative community of peers but none of the guts that actually make it work. Should a genuine community arise it will be a happy accident and would exist in an awkward tension with the profit driven owners who were not responsible for it but will try always to charge for it (a commonplace strategy of the networked age).
A critical destination

A critical destination

Although in a way I am happy for him, the story of the chef who moved into a Pure House property and describes how satisfying it is that people ask him how his day was when he gets home makes me sad. He has to pay $2400 or more per month to get friends to live with. And even those friends, so dearly bought, do not stay.

The whole idea presented in this article reminds me of a management handbook I once read. It began by explaining how study after study and anecdote after anecdote showed that morale was better, productivity was higher, absenteeism was rarer, and creativity and effort flowed in abundance when workers on a project felt like equal partners, felt like they had real agency and freedom, basically when they felt empowered. It then went on to suggest ways to trick your employees into thinking they were equal empowered partners without actually changing any of the fundamental power dynamics in the corporation.

The idea of a cooperative community of equals is an incomprehensible absurdity to capitalism because it exists outside of the profit-seeking and individualist paradigm. There is no way to understand it within those paradigms. To attempt to privatize, systematize, and commodify such a thing is to destroy it.

They are doomed.

New Communities in Washington DC?!

We are constantly guessing when and what type of events we should be organizing in order to spark the new communities movement. This time we clearly guessed right.

Triple Threat organizing discussion groups

Triple Threat organizing discussion groups

We had about 70 people at this quickly organized event.  We crowded the Keep with enthusiastic and chatty folks. Many were experienced community people but for most of the group this was relatively new stuff.

John Keep describes his collective house and their trajectory towards income sharing

John Keep describes his collective house and their trajectory towards income sharing

Lovely food and engaging conversation were had. After GPaul did a wild and woolly version of open space technology, we broke into working groups talking about:

I was in the healing discussion group which was held in part in an empty Jacuzzi tub.

There were a lot of people richly chatting in the Keep kitchen

There were a lot of people richly chatting in the Keep kitchen

It was a lovely warm up for our content in NYC this coming weekend, the Community Matchmaking (see Facebook Invite) event. Here is the evolving program for that event, being held at the Brooklyn Free School.

GPaul at the helm

GPaul at the helm

All photos by Dragon

Pack Lightly

There were a few moments in planning for the upcoming PANYC trip that it looked like we were going to have very little space for luggage.  “Let’s all travel light,” I suggested.  “I can pack less than you,” Triple Threat said in that reckless manner she has.  Except she can’t.

My current plan is to bring nothing.

no baggage

Yes, I will have the one change of clothes on my back and carry a cell phone charger and toothbrush in my pocket- but I can do a week long trip in another city without a backpack or suitcase.  In fact it is almost my preference.

You might say “But don’t you want a change of clothes?”  Sure, that would be nice, and I have lots of generous friends (as almost everyone does) who are willing to put up with my slightly strange behavior so I will tell stories and do their dishes.  Many of them feel good about sharing their stuff- no one ever asks, so they don’t get a chance to show up in this way.  A few years back I made a New Years resolution to travel without luggage, though I could not pull it off consistently.  But in a pinch, no problem.

Trip never had a chance.

Perhaps more than one person should try to do

Paxus’s Plans

Spring 2014

I am an Oaker again.  I thought it would be a good time to check in and tell the community what I am doing and planning and hoping for.

Short version:

My work scene at Twin Oaks is largely unchanged.  I do some homeschooling and an occasional Unicorns shift.  I drive the tofu truck and do L Bus.  I continue in a reduced way to Hx marketing.  I do recruiting work mostly with visitors and paid college speaking gigs thru TOAST.  Outside Work is mostly self managing, but I put occasional time into it.  I work on the Communities Conference and do a bit of movement support, mostly around the local nuclear power plant.

At Acorn I do some room assigning work, shadow manage the picking room and paid outside workers (including Oakers) we have during the busy season (which is ending around now).  I also do recruiting work for Acorn and the FEC.  I blog pretty regularly and am working on the seed businesses on going fight against Monsanto.  I facilitate community meeting and do mediations.

With GPaul principally and some other communards (mostly at Acorn so far) I am working on the Point A project which is attempting to start new income sharing communities in DC and NYC at least.  For the last few months I have been spending about a week a month in east Coast cities promoting this project and organizing events.

I am also applying to be a planner at Twin Oaks again.  I will put out a separate paper about this shortly.  [The existing planners decided not to advance my candidacy for planner after 7 members said they had concerns about me as a planner again.]

For many people this will be plenty of information about me and you can be done with this mailbox letter.  And for others, there is greater curiosity and interest in the details.  For the curious, read on.

 

Detailed version:

Things I am doing at Twin Oaks:

Heroes and Superheroes: These are two homeschooling fantasy role playing games.  Heroes in on Wednesdays and is Kaya, Willow, Evan and Rowan (with Jonah and Gwen dropping in if they are on the farm).  Superheroes is on Mondays and is Sami, Izzie and Zadek.  The format of the game is the players are on adventures where they are regularly rolling dice to determine outcomes.  When they roll low, unfortunate outcomes occur, if they roll a 1 on a 20 sided die, very unfortunate and occasionally lethal things happen.  They can get another role if they can answer a question correctly.  So the game is a cross between Dungeons and Dragons and Trivial Pursuits – except the questions are mostly significa and at different levels for different players.  If you are interested in working on good multiple choice or short answer questions for these games, please talk with me.

Unicorns: I do the Monday Unicorns shift with Kristen every other week, but with the amount I am gone it ends up averaging every 3 weeks.

Unicorns group shot

Potomac Tofu Delivery: i drive our fine tofu to Potomac Whole Foods in western MD every other Monday.  Importantly, I am starting to back haul stuff for both Acorn and Twin Oaks so we can shift away from UNFI.

Friday L Bus:  I combine the Acorn and Twin Oaks Friday Louisa Bus/Tripper runs on most Fridays.  This occasionally means I do not make it back from the trip until past noon and thus things are not delivered at ZK early in lunch.  It also means about a third of the time I drive Acorn vehicles instead of Twin Oaks vehicles for the town trip.  I am building a relationship with the Louisa Resource Center, which is among other things the local food bank.  Last time I picked up 200 rolls of toilet paper, 8 large cases of acorn squash, 10 crates of nectarines (which were a bit marginal) and 10 of the foldable plastic crates.  All for free.   I will be coordinating with Carly to make sure I don’t bring in too much of the wrong stuff.

Hammocks Marketing:  Hawina and I are doing a somewhat low key hammocks marketing effort.  I am calling some of our regular wholesale customers and maintaining minimal contact with our sales reps.  I visit our largest east coast customers before the trade show that we dont go to anymore.  We are working on several “special projects” together, we have a new hanging chair stand that we displaying at fairs and online and drop shipping from the manufacturer.  We might be bundled with this new innovative hammock stand, with an initial order of 500 silkspun rope hammocks.  I continue to be the principal contact with Dave from Buyers Choice who has been a very big and headachy customer in the past.  We tried some retail strategies last year which were not super effective.  We will probably try something else new for retail this year.  If you are interested in helping with hammocks sales, please contact Hawina or myself.

paxus sleeping on cushion swing

Product testing is the key to our success

 

Recruitment:  Valerie and I co-manage recruiting and outreach.  Separately, Valerie handles all visitor correspondence.  Recruitment during times of high population shifts it’s focus from seeking new members for Twin Oaks specifically to recruiting for the movement in general.  Recent recruiting activities include our trip to the North American Student Cooperative Organization where we facilitated several workshops.  And TOAST gigs at McDonogh prep school, Goucher (where ex-member Raj teaches, he is Mala’s brother) and the conservative mostly Christian East Carolina University.  [TOAST is the Twin Oaks Academic Speaking Tour where we are paid, typically $200 per day, to present about the communities at schools.]

Outside Work:  This area largely runs itself, and while I am technically the manager, most of the Outside Work areas need no assistance or oversight from me.  Though i do hope to craft some new policy around OW in the coming year.

Communities Conference:    We have started work on the communities conference, specifically I worked with Sky on recruiting donors for the IndieGoGo crowd sourcing campaign for the kitchen upgrade.  I will again be calling communities and encouraging them to come and working on content with Sky and Valerie as we develop the program for the event.

Work with Willow:  The entire Star family (Hawina, Willow, Sky and myself) do a Tuesday K2.  Willow and I are doing a weekly Tupelo Surf.

tpp-protest-sitting-with-noses

Movement Support:  I continue to work on blocking the third reactor at North Anna.  I might go to the Dominion Resources shareholders meeting again this year and chat again with the President Tom Ferral about how poor an investment this is.  [I did not go this year to the shareholders meeting.]  I do some organizing work (in Richmond and DC) around Dominions fleecing taxpayers and ratepayers for this ill conceived project.

Contrary to recent beliefs, I do not do EC Runs.

Transparency Groups:  I am in closed group at Twin Oaks and an open group at Acorn.  This practice is both engaging and important to me.  We just completed a fingerbook on it, contact me if you want one.  If you want to try this stuff i can connect you to the Acorn group.  There are no labor credits involved in any of these transparency groups.


zippers-on-back-body-art

Plannership:  I have signed the card for being a planner again.  I will be writing an O&I paper about this assuming i dont get tremendous negative input.  My hope is to balance the current strong group of planners.  I am especially interested in room issues, the 134 W Old Mountain Road property, tabulating and presenting long term survey results (which I failed to do in my last plannership), new residence planning and sustainability infrastructure.  I am aware that I am often away, and will only be able to do this job part time, but all three other planners are almost always on the farm, so if feels like we are well covered.  [i was not selected.]

Things I am doing at Acorn:

Room Assigning:  Rejoice and I share room assigning responsibilities at Acorn.  I do not have a bedroom at Acorn, even when I am a member.  [i now do have a room, which i got from Falcon.]

Extraordinary Worker Management:  The seed business hires locals (mostly folks from communities Little Flower and Twin Oaks and some ex-members) to help pick, pack and ship seeds during the busy season.  The busy season is now over and almost all of these people have been let go til at least December.

Shadow Picking Room Manager:  Acorn does not have managers (and actually this works surprisingly well) instead people take responsibility for different areas and are in dynamic negotiations with the rest of the seed business worker owners.  I train seed pickers, report and update out of stock items to Ken, work with Irena on configuring shelves and picking room layout.  And frankly I was much busier with this last winter during busy season than this one, in part because so many people stepped up to help with picking it was quite easy to keep under control and current.  This will likely be one of my larger jobs when I toggle back to membership at Acorn in December.

Recruiting and Outreach:  At Acorn I also do tours, answer questions for people interested in the community and write about the community for alternative and mainstream medias.  I also talk about Acorn at schools and at the Point A workshops we are organizing.  I am working on a visitor fingerbook for Acorn, similar to the “Not Utopia Yet” one I originally wrote for Twin Oaks.

Seed Robot Operator: This is an an aspiration and i have yet to be trained.

SESE Social Media/Blog:   There is a newly formed social media group at Acorn which is working to try to promote the seed business online thru this vehicle.  i am one of the members of this group.  Part of this is working with others on blogs for the SESE website which are relevant for gardeners who purchase our seeds.

Delivery Boy:  Seeds in both directions, Milk, workers, surplus dumpster and food bank food, tofu repacks, party shuttle – you name it i am moving people and stuff between these two communes (with stops at Sapling as needed).

Monsanto Opposition Campaigning:  SESE continues to pursue lawsuits and a public education campaign against Monsanto’s use of GMOs.  I have only done a small amount of this work so far, mostly through our alliance with OSGATA, which is an organic seed growers trade association that has brought multiple lawsuits against the chemical giant, which despite their army of lawyers has had some positive effects already.  If you are interested in working against GMOs, feel encouraged to contact me.

monstanto poinons food

Things I am doing for the Point A Project

With 4 income sharing communities now in Louisa County and only one secular one in all of NYC, it seems like it is time for us to export this model to urban areas.  Several folks from Acorn (including Amy, Belladonna, Otter, Dragon, Aster (formerly Jared), Port (formerly John ex TO viz) and GPaul) are working on this project.

There is significant interest at the Keep in Washington DC, where Feonix, Marshall, Steve, John and Aries (ex TO viz) all live.  There are about 20 people involved in this group which is looking for places which might be able to house more people than the 8 at the Keep.  There are also discussion about the entire range of community issues from pets to income sharing to children.  I would be surprised if this group moved into a larger community house in 2014.  And there is a lot of interest and I think the chances are pretty high that we will start another FEC community in the DC metro area in the next few years.

NYC is harder.  Gentrification issues and real estate developers make any type of housing solution vexing in this town.  We have a group which is interested in the Point A project, but we are much further from living together and to date we have been focusing on doing events (presentations and workshops) about the communities movement and sharing systems to find out who are allies are in the city.  Unlike DC where we are supporting a specific group which is looking to build a single community, in NYC we are doing something which is more like movement building and have already been significant support to other communities which are forming or looking for new members.

I am hoping to continue to do work in this area and hope that the FEC will continue to support it with hours (as they did for the mini-communities conference we had in in March).

NYC is like Crack

“Your organizing style exhausts me,” GPaul complained, and my occasionally defensive nature did not put up a struggle.  Even for me this event felt a bit like a bridge too far.

NYC proved intoxicating with its density and rapid possibilities.  In February, we had announced a discussion of the income sharing communities in Virginia and the new Point A project.   We announced it less than a week before the event, which was on a Tuesday night, and we did not even have a venue until 3 days before the event.  Still 65 people came (Facebook predicted 60).  Some powerful alliances were made.  At first GPaul and i thought these new connections had been more fortunate for our friends at Catalyst Community and other community/ecovillage projects which had participated in the event than they had been for us.  But we were wrong.

Catalyst Community has lovely images of futuristic communities

Catalyst Community has lovely images of futuristic communities

Elena and Beatrice and Teagan and Arrow and Andrew and Jaimi from the venue we presented at, the BUZ, all were huge helps especially in networking.  And in the face of this support i convinced GPaul that we should immediately turn around and do it again in March, only bigger.

This time we would announce it two weeks in advance, we would run a Friday night program of Transparency Tools by Marta and Roberto, and then 6 hours of content midday on Saturday.  Internally, we referred to this as a “mini communities conference”.  At the time we announced we had 6 workshops and a panel discussion on the schedule. We also only had one confirmed presenter.  And since all the content was either urban or NYC specific, unlike the February event, neither GPaul nor i could facilitate the material which we had proposed.

Then NYC decided we were interesting.  Three days after we announced the event nearly 100 RSVPs plus 40 maybes on Facebook were telling us they were coming.  What if they all come?  What if more people than this come, because there is more promotion coming and it is still 10 days away?  i started seeking more content, for an event that did not have a stable group of confirmed presenters for the initial proposal.  We added a Bridges to Burners workshop and one on the Lessons from Occupy as it relates to intentional community.

occupy-wall-st-alan-test1

“Do you have a lot of money?”  started one person who i was directed to as a presenter on gentrification.  When i confessed that we did not, they told me that there was nothing which could be done on gentrification without it.  i realized that this person was failing as an activist.  When you finish your conversation with an activist you feel like there is something that you can do to make the situation better.  Dis-empowering messages are the purview of policy analysts and wonks.  At the least, activists have stuff they want to try.  Gentrification was especially vexing because i did not have any useful experience with it and we had no direct contacts to people working the issue.  I was already feeling the crash of the NYC opiate high.

Fortunately, former Twin Oaks and Acorn visitor Eman agreed to present on gentrification and multiculturalism.  She simply laughed at the notion that without money we were helpless to change things. Eman is an amazing story in herself.  A long time NYC community organizer and fundraiser, she has lost both her legs in the past year to a blood clotting disorder.  She agreed to give the “solutions half” of the popular workshop.  To get her to these workshops required me carrying her up the several flights of stairs of this non ADA compliant venue.

Let's talk about multiculturalism and stopping gentrification

Let’s talk about multiculturalism and stopping gentrification

A week before the event Facebook was saying that we had 125 participants confirmed and almost 100 maybes.  I went and did a walk through of the space and then relaxed a bit.  There were additional rooms for workshops and BUZ organizer Jaimi would give up his personal room as a child care space or spare workshop space.  Even if we had 175 people, we were going to have enough space for 5 concurrent good sized workshops.

It is easy for me to write up workshop descriptions and put them up on a website.  It is another thing to fill the 15 odd slots on for panel discussions and workshop facilitators with knowledgeable people who present reasonably well.  And then there is this little thing that i am terribly disorganized.

At the initial panel discussion, Andrew, who was working sound, asked “How many chairs and mics should we set up?” and i realized i did not know the answer to the question. One speaker had confirmed, two were maybes and several others had not responded to my inquiries.  And then some people who i invited surprised me and showed up to present.  In the end, five very different and quite engaging people presented.

The audience (and organizers) loved their stories.  These included avoiding unrelated persons occupancy restrictions by appearing to be a family.  The way the authorities determine this is if you have all your toothbrushes in the bathroom and no interior locks between bedrooms.

The CIA under Reagan brought crack and cocaine into the US

The CIA under Reagan brought crack and cocaine into the US*

I have never done crack.  Thirty years ago when i tried cocaine and it did not have much of an effect.  My girlfriend at the time posited:

You are coke are redundant.  You already have a huge ego.  You already think you are unstoppable.  You are already arrogant and pushy and in a huge rush.

This observation perhaps saved me from an expensive habit.    But the analogy with NYC lingers.  NYC comes on powerfully.  It gives you the illusion you can do anything.  It changes your internal clock and everything starts to go faster.  And then it dumps you out the other side, often not gently.

Only 80 people came to the final event (not counting the 25 who came to Transparency Tools the night before, which was the perfect size).   We lost a couple hundred dollars. But despite this attendance let down, we were all pretty satisfied with the content.  And we have new respect for this complex and occasionally deceptive city.

——-

* Wikipedia article on the Reagan Administrations confession to the CIA trafficking crack and cocaine revealed after the Iran Contra Scandal.

Point A Mission Statement

i hate mission statements.  The business press is clear that i am a fool in this believe because virtually everything written about mission statements harps on how important they are, how they help direct and guide people in the company, how you can’t really succeed unless you have a carefully crafted mission statement.

mission statement incomprehesnible

i have been involved with well meaning board members who drafted or recrafted mission statements.  i have been involved with dozens of organizations (both for profit and non profit) which have mission statements.  i have never once seen a mission statement used to solve a problem or direct a decision.  As best i can tell, they get written (often by too many people) and then they get ignored.  They are, as best i can tell, a complete waste of time.

mission statement awkward

But people love them, including clever people who i like and work with. When we started talking about forming a new urban high achievement oriented community – which is currently called Point A – there was a call for a mission statement.  i just let go of my resistance and helped make it happen.

Point A – Mission and Commitment

To create a community that:

  • Inspires and supports high achievement by the community and its members.
  • Propagates itself by spinning off new communities.
  • Balances the success of the community with the mandate to radically transform and improve the world.

Elaborations

High achievement means significantly contributing to constructive, extroverted, endeavors.  Bringing out the new world that lives in our hearts and making a post-revolutionary paradise for ourselves is not enough.  We seek change towards greater humanity and sustainability not just in our lives but in the lives of everyone.  The commitment is to be a force pushing for positive change in the world.

High achievement requires high communication.  Effective decision systems are of necessity rich/high bandwidth communication environments.  On the personal relationship development side we will need to agree on some tool kit which could be transparency tools or landmark or something which MBAs use that we dont know about.  The commitment is to be in a dynamic conversation about the needs and desires of both the individuals and the group and be committed to action and experiments which fill those needs and desires.

Communiversity:  Incubating new communities requires an openness to people outside the residential collective and a willingness to teach and mentor them and learn from them.  This part of the project could specialize in assisting with launching economic engines for groups.  Modeling successful resource and money management will thus be a high value.  The commitment is to look for allies who want to start innovative communities and figure out how we can mutually reach the goals.

Responsibility for more than our footprint.  We propose that the community improve the world, and to do so the community must be successful in its mission which will require intelligent tradeoffs.. We recognize our obligation to be advancing improvements which have great leverage.  Sharing systems, libraries, labor banks, sustainable manufacturing, clean energy production, worker coops and gift based economic models all likely have a role in this. The commitment is to do an analysis of impact and accessibility and figure out which of these systems makes the most sense to deploy first and what the plan is for likely future systems implementation.

footprint

No Democrats

This is clearly not the crowd to do a reality show with.  Perhaps 15 of the 19 people assembled thought the values or impact of a reality television production crew filming was not worth whatever we might get paid.

This group of prospective urban communards were also into living with children and somehow under this topic pets got snuck into the conversation, lots of dog and cat lovers in this group as well.

Most of these Keepers are interested in Point A

Most of these Keepers are interested in Point A

We did spend several minutes talking about governance models including:

  • Consensus
  • Dictatorship of the proletariat
  • Responsible Anarchy
  • Democracy
  • Historian
  • Sociocracy
  • Self selected troika

The dictatorship of the proletariat was a joking Marx reference.  The self selecting troika was poking fun at Rez, GPaul and myself as initial organizers.  We did not really have anyone advocating for democracy, as in voting systems.  There is some level of broad cultural agreement between these participants that consensus was the way to go. Many had experienced C. T. Butler’s conventional consensus. I pitched my favorite pieces of sociocracy (quick reaction rounds and the desirability candidate selection models) which basically includes consensus.  But really, for an item as powerful as decision making the group seemed broadly satisfied with some flavor of everyone agrees or stands aside plus advanced communication tools.  

Not this troika - not these communists

Not this troika – not these communists

We worked for 5 hours, touched on a myriad of topics from food to income engines to community projects and space needs and group fun.  We broke within minutes of our agreed completion time.  Most people seemed quite satisfied with the meeting, and research and networking next steps were agreed on before our next planned February meeting.

And as is often the case at these meetings some of the most important conversations took place after the meeting.  Jas talked about his work on climate disruption and we ran fantasies of a Point A incarnation that was running multiple styles of campaigns on sustainable electricity generation and carbon abatement.  The advantage of selecting climate disruption as the issue (“climate change” is way out, in that it is a deceptively soothing name for a jarring problem) is there are so many handles to grab it with.  Everything from cargo bikes, to urban wind and solar stations, to working on broader campaigns against specific dirty facilities or in favor of a carbon tax.

And while this talk was exciting and inspiring, the most important of all perhaps was with Steve at 4 AM.  He wants to start scouting.  I talked about Can Masdeu in Barcelona, where they searched for a year until they finally found an abandoned hospital, which they squatted and still control now a decade later.  Steve and i were in agreement that we wanted to come through the front door (be legal and present as we are) but Steve and i both started getting excited about an abandoned hospital in DC which is right near a metro station.

Zero net carbon footprint low cost housing anyone?

[Edited by Judy Youngquest]